California Insurance – Tinigard http://tinigard.info/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 10:57:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tinigard.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png California Insurance – Tinigard http://tinigard.info/ 32 32 Covered California’s Award-Winning Outreach Efforts Recognized https://tinigard.info/covered-californias-award-winning-outreach-efforts-recognized/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 04:52:33 +0000 https://tinigard.info/covered-californias-award-winning-outreach-efforts-recognized/ Covered California has won three prestigious Telly Awards in recognition of its efforts to deliver its message of affordable, quality health care coverage to all Californians. The Spanish language TV commercial “Corazón” aired during the last open registration period. The ad depicts a father watching his daughter grow from a toddler to her quinceañera, and […]]]>

Covered California has won three prestigious Telly Awards in recognition of its efforts to deliver its message of affordable, quality health care coverage to all Californians.

The Spanish language TV commercial “Corazón” aired during the last open registration period. The ad depicts a father watching his daughter grow from a toddler to her quinceañera, and highlights the importance of good healthcare coverage on this journey.

“Covered California believes in and invests in marketing to all of our state’s diverse populations,” said Executive Director Jessica Altman. “We pride ourselves on the culturally relevant content we create to reach Californians with the message that affordable health insurance is available for them and their families. These awards show the value of this approach.

Covered California’s marketing division created the ad with multicultural marketing agency Barú. The ad won awards in three categories: two Silver Tellys for Branded Content General – Government Relations and Regional TV General – Insurance; and a bronze medal in the Regional General Television – Health and Safety category.

Since 1979, the Telly Awards have been a major honor for video and television content across all screens. This year’s awards saw over 11,000 submissions with nominated companies including ViacomCBS, Warner Bros., Sony Music Entertainment, Microsoft and ESPN.

Covered California’s commitment to reaching California’s diverse population, in addition to the increased financial assistance now available through the US bailout, has contributed to a dramatic increase in the number of Latinos enrolled in the market.

The most recent data shows that a total of 372,640 Californians who identify as Latino were actively enrolled in Covered California at the end of 2021. This represents a 17% increase from the end of 2020 and an increase of 44% compared to the end of 2019.

The California Covered Special Enrollment Period is currently available to eligible uninsured Californians. The most common qualifying life events are loss of health coverage, marriage, birth of a baby, permanent move to California, and moving to California.

Additionally, several eligible life events are available due to the public health emergency and the US bailout:

• You or a member of your family have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

• You have a family income below 150% of the federal poverty line, ie less than $19,320 for an individual and $39,750 for a family of four. Eligible consumers in this income bracket would be eligible for a Silver 94 plan, the best coverage available through Covered California, at no cost.

• You paid the penalty because you did not have health insurance.

Individuals who enroll during Special Enrollment will have their coverage begin on the first of the following month.

People can explore their options in different ways.

• Covered California’s online shopping and comparison tool will show consumers if they qualify for financial assistance and what plans are available in their area.

• Find a certified recruiter near you by visiting https://www.coveredca.com/support/contact-us/.

• Call Covered California at (800) 300-1506 for information or to register over the phone.

Covered California’s online enrollment portal and certified recruiters will also help people find out if they qualify for Medi-Cal. Enrollment in Medi-Cal is available year-round and coverage will begin the day after a person enrolls.

Covered California is the state’s health insurance marketplace, where Californians can find affordable, high-quality insurance from top insurance companies. Covered California is the only place eligible people can get financial assistance on a sliding scale to reduce premium costs. Consumers can then compare health insurance plans and choose the one that best suits their health needs and budget. Depending on their income, some consumers may qualify for the low-cost or no-cost Medi-Cal program.

Covered California is an independent part of the state government whose job it is to make the health insurance market work for California consumers. It is overseen by a five-member board appointed by the governor and the legislature. For more information about Covered California, visit www.CoveredCA.com.

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Same eye surgery cost husband thousands more than wife: Gunshots https://tinigard.info/same-eye-surgery-cost-husband-thousands-more-than-wife-gunshots/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 09:00:49 +0000 https://tinigard.info/same-eye-surgery-cost-husband-thousands-more-than-wife-gunshots/ Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, underwent identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were dramatically different — even though the couple from Fresno, Calif., were covered by the same health plan. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption toggle caption Heidi de Marco/KHN Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, underwent identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were […]]]>

Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, underwent identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were dramatically different — even though the couple from Fresno, Calif., were covered by the same health plan.

Heidi de Marco/KHN


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Heidi de Marco/KHN


Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, underwent identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were dramatically different — even though the couple from Fresno, Calif., were covered by the same health plan.

Heidi de Marco/KHN

Danilo Manimtim’s vision was hazy and blurry – and it was getting worse.

The 73-year-old retired orthopedic surgeon in Fresno, Calif., knew it was time for cataract surgery. “It’s like the tires on a car are wearing out because you drive on them so much,” he said.

In December 2021, he visited the local hospital outpatient department to undergo the common procedure which usually replaces the natural eye lens with an artificial lens and is designed to restore vision. The outpatient procedure went well and Manimtim healed over the following weeks.

Manimtim, who has disability claims adjudication work for the state of California, knows the health care system and monitors its health benefits. He knew he had already reached his health insurance deductible for the year, so he expected a manageable expense for the surgery. He calculated that his coinsurance would be approximately $750.

Then the bills came.

Patient: Danilo Manimtim, 73, of Fresno, California. He is insured through his employer by Anthem Blue Cross of California for outpatient care and is covered by Medicare for hospitalization.

Total bill: Overall, the charges were $9,084 for surgery, anesthesia, medical supplies, pharmacy, and clinical laboratory services. Anthem paid $5,027 and initially charged Manimtim $4,057.

Service providers: Saint Agnes Medical Center. It is part of Trinity Health, a nonprofit hospital system headquartered in Michigan with 88 hospitals and 125 urgent care centers across the country. The hospital system brought in nearly $20.2 billion in revenue for the last fiscal year.

Medical service: Cataract surgery on an outpatient basis, involving anesthesia.

Which give: Manimtim’s big bill stems from a simple decision that turned out to be a trap in the country’s complex healthcare system: He scheduled his surgery at a nearby hospital – a hospital that charged about $7,000 more. for the procedure than her insurer would pay.

Manimtim has proof that it could have been different under his own roof: four months later, his wife, Marilou Manimtim, 66, underwent the exact same procedure at an outpatient eye care surgical center in Fresno called EYE-Q. It is half a mile from Saint Agnes Medical Center but is not affiliated with the hospital.

Both patients have the same insurance coverage through Anthem Blue Cross of California; they underwent identical cataract surgeries; and both providers were part of Anthem’s coverage network. Marilou owed $204, while Danilo was on the hook for a staggering $4,057.

“It’s ridiculous and it seems very unfair,” said Danilo Manimtim. “How can it be so much more expensive than the surgical center? It’s within walking distance, and if I had gone there, I would have saved a lot of money.”

Manimtim’s insurance plan, through his employer, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System, caps payment for outpatient cataract surgery at $2,000, according to Anthem. CalPERS has instituted a “benchmark price” system in recent years, in which it determines a reasonable price for a high-quality procedure of this type in California. It then only reimburses up to that amount, encouraging patients to buy treatments at prices below the bar. For the cataract surgery itself, Manimtim plan patients are responsible for all costs over $2,000.

Even for hospital care, Saint Agnes’ overall charges are high for cataract surgery, said Dr. Ira Weintraub, chief medical officer of WellRithms, which analyzes health care prices for employers. “The hospital charged three to four times what this surgery typically costs, which is about $3,000.”

“Nobody gets $9,000 for cataract surgery,” he added.

If Manimtim had opted for Medicare Part B, the part of the Medicare program that covers outpatient care, he likely would have been liable for only about $565, ​​according to a Medicare cost comparison tool. Medicare pays a fixed amount for the procedures, regardless of where they are performed.

But like many older Americans who are still working, Manimtim opted out of this coverage, opting instead for his employer’s plan because his monthly premium would be significantly cheaper.

Healthcare prices often have very little to do with the true costs of delivering care and its quality – and patients often face the “double whammy” of high prices and complex benefits, said Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access California, a nonprofit organization. advocacy group. Too often, patients are left to figure out how to use their diet’s benefits on their own, he said.

“You wonder what the rationale is for any of the prices in our health care system,” Wright said.

Resolution: After investigation by KHN, Anthem contacted the hospital, Saint Agnes, asking for help for Manimtim. Although the doctor was instructed to seek an exemption from CalPERS’ $2,000 limit on payments for cataract surgery under Manimtim’s plan, this did not happen before his surgery. Anthem asked the hospital and doctor to review the claim after the surgery, Anthem spokesman Michael Bowman said.

Saint Agnes spokeswoman Kelley Sanchez told KHN that the hospital and provider then applied for the waiver that would allow the insurer to pay more than the $2,000 limit and that she eventually been approved by Anthem. That should leave Manimtim with a much smaller coinsurance bill, around $750 – and off the hook for being taken to collections by the hospital. The hospital will receive a higher payment from Anthem, which will cover much of the remaining bill of $4,057.

And this high payment, like all high payments, contributes to the increase in health insurance payments for all.

Sanchez said the hospital is not in the business of price gouging, but noted that hospitals generally have higher costs and tend to charge more than outpatient facilities.

“We never want to cause harm or create hardship for our patients, and that extends to our billing practices,” Sanchez said in a prepared statement.

She noted that Saint Agnes has financial assistance programs available and encourages patients to ask questions and understand potential costs before seeking care. “Every patient’s insurance plan is unique, so it is their responsibility to understand the benefits of their plan,” she wrote. “It’s still complicated and we recognize that, and we will continue to work for greater price transparency.”

The takeaway: The bottom line for patients, experts say, is to make sure to read the fine print of insurance plans to understand all personal responsibilities, including premiums, deductibles, copayments and coinsurance. In addition, a small number of large employers who self-insure use benchmark prices, capping what they will pay for common procedures. Shop around and ask about prices up front if possible.

“People often focus on premiums because they’re easy to compare, but premiums don’t tell the whole story, and this example illustrates the trade-offs,” said KFF Medicare expert Tricia Neuman.

Anthem spokesperson Bowman urged patients to use Anthem’s online “care finder” to compare patient costs and find a cheaper option if available. If Manimtim had done that, he might have seen that getting cataract surgery at an outpatient surgery center would have been a lot cheaper. But details of provider cost and insurance coverage can be idiosyncratic and often not displayed in a patient-friendly way. Manimtim tried to explore its benefits before the procedure, he said, but did not get a clear answer from the insurer or the hospital.

Manimtim also had advice for consumers: if you get a medical bill and don’t understand the charges, don’t pay right away. Instead, call your provider and insurer to find out about the charges and if there are ways to lower your bill.

“People need to be better informed by insurance companies and hospitals about the options available to them, to avoid overcharging,” Manimtim said. “A lot of people don’t know it could happen to them.”

Stephanie O’Neill contributed to the audio portrait with this story.

Bill of the Month is a participatory survey conducted by KHN and NPR who dissects and explains medical bills. Do you have an interesting medical bill that you want to share with us? Tell us about it!

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How North Coast California winemakers are finding bottles, labor and a way out of the pandemic https://tinigard.info/how-north-coast-california-winemakers-are-finding-bottles-labor-and-a-way-out-of-the-pandemic/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 15:11:01 +0000 https://tinigard.info/how-north-coast-california-winemakers-are-finding-bottles-labor-and-a-way-out-of-the-pandemic/ We pride ourselves on making affordable everyday wines and liquors with the intention of bringing value to consumers. Our intention is to create lasting relationships with customers, and we believe affordability is an important part of what we continually strive for. Insurance has become a real challenge over the past three years and although we […]]]>

We pride ourselves on making affordable everyday wines and liquors with the intention of bringing value to consumers. Our intention is to create lasting relationships with customers, and we believe affordability is an important part of what we continually strive for.

Insurance has become a real challenge over the past three years and although we have an excellent track record with few to no claims, we are not exempt from huge increases due to the many losses insurers have suffered within of the industry and fair overall. .

Fortunately, our safety record is one of the best and we have managed to keep these costs fairly. We buy a lot of grapes and wine in bulk, so even if our policies stabilize a little, we know that these costs must be passed on to our suppliers so that they continue to supply the fruit needed for the next vintage. We’ve been very lucky in terms of labor turnover, but I know it’s been a tough time for many others.

How does your current level of sales and approach to marketing compare to pre-pandemic? What innovations from the past two years are you keeping or leaving behind?

Richard Bruno

As a small producer, it has become apparent that most of our wines are sold to independent restaurants. As we try to diversify into business retail, our sales have increased as restaurants have reopened and become healthy businesses again.

We had packed a good part of our wine in barrels for on-site accounts. As the pandemic has closed most restaurants, we have consequently reduced our stocks of wines on tap. We will continue to use a just-in-time inventory approach for the kegging and may run out of stock from time to time.

Hugh Davies

While 2020 was a tough year, demand outstripped supply in 2021, and that trend continues in 2022. We saw growth through direct-to-consumer and three-tier wholesale channels. Concerted marketing efforts during the pandemic have provided us with a unique opportunity to connect with our consumers and wholesale partners.

Zoom presentations, digital campaigns, virtual tastings, and good old-fashioned phone connections have all expanded our ability to connect with our audience. At the winery, while visitor numbers are stable, the diversity of experiences, including outdoor tastings, has increased during the pandemic, and our visitors have really enjoyed this transition.

Michael Honig

Sales have been really strong, and I just wish we had more wine. We have adjusted some of our sales and reduced our business trips. The pandemic forced us to pivot and think of innovative ways to market our brand and reach consumers who couldn’t travel or visit.

We’ve adopted a robust virtual tasting program, hosting hundreds of consumer tastings, as well as partnering with companies like Google, Wells Fargo, and UBS to offer tastings to their employees instead of sales meetings and wrap-up parties. of year. It was also a great opportunity to focus on a stronger social media presence.

Rather than streaming tastings with our winemaker, we decided to partner with well-known celebrities to taste our wines on Instagram Live. It was very fun! As with most wineries, we have seen a significant increase in online wine sales (around 400%). Many people didn’t know it was possible to order wine for home delivery, but once they found out it was very popular.

Will Jarvis

We are currently experiencing a post-pandemic increase in visits. People who have been cooped up in their homes during the pandemic are eager to travel, and Napa is a popular national destination.

We experimented with “virtual tastings” during the pandemic, but it was not a good substitute for tasting wines together in person and we are abandoning this practice.

However, over the past two years we have also experimented with successful direct-to-consumer “in-market” events which we plan to continue.

Michael Muscardini

As I said before, we are very focused on marketing our experiences. I think for a winery our size, it really helped our sales. It sounds simple, but someone at the winery has to ask customers who come in the door to buy wine or shop online, “What would they like?” What are they looking for?”

Our main innovation is that for two years we have been asking for reservations. It made all the difference in the world. Our Tasting Room Manager Nick Ciccolella can handle all staff schedules around our bookings. The goal is to never be understaffed and we use TOK.

Omar Percich

We’ve actually been lucky in some ways because grocery sales have really jumped during the pandemic, but we’ve lost sales globally on the spot and those are just recovering. Overall, we are pleased to see our portfolio doing well and we will continue to innovate products using the strengths of our people and our expertise.

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Mercury General: Insurance Partnership Puts Rooftops and the Environment First https://tinigard.info/mercury-general-insurance-partnership-puts-rooftops-and-the-environment-first/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:56:06 +0000 https://tinigard.info/mercury-general-insurance-partnership-puts-rooftops-and-the-environment-first/ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: PCG – Kyle Reuter (424) 903-3657 (kreuter@pacificcommunicationsgroup.com) LOS ANGELES, Calif. (June 21, 2022) – Mercury Insurance (NYSE: MCY) today announced an industry-first partnership with Roof Rx, a home services company focused on providing high-quality repair solutions to extend the life of house roofs, for new and existing home policyholders. These Roof […]]]>

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: PCG – Kyle Reuter (424) 903-3657 (kreuter@pacificcommunicationsgroup.com)

LOS ANGELES, Calif. (June 21, 2022) – Mercury Insurance (NYSE: MCY) today announced an industry-first partnership with Roof Rx, a home services company focused on providing high-quality repair solutions to extend the life of house roofs, for new and existing home policyholders. These Roof Rx inspections will include an advanced drone technology service with expert analysis to assess the current condition of a home’s roof.

The recent focus on waste management in Southern California has propelled smart disposal habits to the fore and Mercury’s partnership with Roof Rx aims to better protect both homeowners’ property and the environment. . On average, roofs can last more than 30 years, but only a certain part reaches halfway through their life cycle. With most homes having a roof weighing around 6,000 pounds, unnecessary re-roofing quickly turns into a significant amount of landfill waste.

“We create so much waste that takes a very long time to break down in our landfills,” said Adam Bakonis, Mercury Insurance Product Manager for Homeowners. “Too many simple roof repairs turn into complete re-roofing, which is bad for homeowners’ wallets and bad for the planet. Mercury Insurance is taking an environmentally responsible stance by identifying ways to better protect the property of policyholders, while leaving a softer footprint on the earth.”

Roof Rx inspections are non-invasive (drone flights require FAA approval and authorization, some exceptions may apply) and are accompanied by detailed aerial imagery. A technician will diagnose the appropriate level of repairs that might be needed, which can include anything from minor shingle replacements to a completely new roof.

New, existing, and returning Mercury Southern California homeowners policyholders have several ways to protect their home:

  • Inspection services only: After an instant discount from Mercury, policyholders will pay only $25.00 for a roof inspection (a significant savings over the retail price of $99.00). If repairs are needed and done with Roof Rx, Mercury policyholders are credited the $25 inspection fee for the repair. If the recommended repairs are performed by Roof Rx, the insured will receive a full one-year roof warranty valued at $329.00, free of charge.
  • Inspection with preventive maintenance: Policyholders receive an instant discount from Mercury and pay only $99.00 for basic inspection and preventative services, especially sealing roof pipe vents (a common source of roof leaks) – which retails for $249.00. If additional repairs are required and performed by Roof Rx, the policyholder will be credited with the $25.00 inspection fee. This service comes with a full one-year roof warranty valued at $329.00 at no additional charge.

“We are thrilled to partner with Mercury and admire the courage of their mission to find smarter ways to give back to their policyholders while protecting the environment. Roof Rx and its associates are proud to help Mercury customers to meet their home maintenance needs in a sustainable, cost-effective manner,” said Eduardo Guerra, CEO of Roof Rx, Inc. “Your roof is a critical asset in protecting your family and your property – the partnership with Mercury Insurance is a natural fit for us. We both want to protect homeowners and the environment, and now our partnership takes that to the next level.”

Roof Rx inspections over the past 12 months have revealed:

  • Less than 2% of roofs inspected by Roof Rx were deemed unusable and required re-roofing.

  • Approximately 55% required only component flashing maintenance.

Visit https://www.mercuryinsurance.com/insurance/homeowners/ to learn more about Mercury products and services.

About Mercury Insurance

Mercury Insurance (NYSE: MCY) is a multi-line insurance company primarily offering auto, home, tenants and commercial insurance through a network of independent agents in Arizona, California, Illinois, Georgia, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Texas and Virginia, as well as auto insurance in Florida. Mercury underwrites other lines of insurance in various states, including business owners and auto, landlord, home-sharing, ride-sharing, and mechanical protection.

Since 1962, Mercury has been providing customers with exceptional value for their insurance dollar by combining ultra-competitive rates with excellent customer service. Mercury earned “A” grades from AM Best and Fitch, as well as first place in the 2021 JD Power U.S. Insurance Digital Experience Study.SM and four consecutive “Best Auto Insurance Company” awards from Insure.com. For more information, visit https://www.mercuryinsurance.com/ or follow the company on Twitter or Facebook.

About Roof Rx, Inc.
At Roof Rx, we make the difference. Our team is focused on providing our customers with quality service through responsible repairs rather than inefficient and unnecessary re-roofing. A typical home has a roof designed to last over 30 years, but on average, roofs across the United States only end up in our landfills halfway through their life cycle. You can help make a difference to the environment by choosing solutions designed to maintain the longevity of your roof. Since our founding in 1998, the impact of our services can be measured in the millions of pounds of roofing material we’ve kept out of our landfills. The average home has a roof that weighs around 6,000 pounds, you can help keep it from going to landfill by fixing your roof instead of re-roofing prematurely by visiting us at www.RoofRx.com.

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California Medi-Cal will cover doulas – InsuranceNewsNet https://tinigard.info/california-medi-cal-will-cover-doulas-insurancenewsnet/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 09:44:11 +0000 https://tinigard.info/california-medi-cal-will-cover-doulas-insurancenewsnet/ California will cover doula services for low-income residents at more than double the initial rate proposed by the state under a spending plan passed by lawmakers this week. Some supporters hailed the new perk by Medical, the state Medicaid health insurance program, as a step toward professionalizing this group of lay birth attendants. They say […]]]>

California will cover doula services for low-income residents at more than double the initial rate proposed by the state under a spending plan passed by lawmakers this week.

Some supporters hailed the new perk by Medical, the state Medicaid health insurance program, as a step toward professionalizing this group of lay birth attendants. They say a better salary can encourage more people to become doulas. Other supporters, however, called it a partial victory, saying the rate is still too low for the time and work needed to ensure healthy deliveries.

Doulas initially criticized the state for offering one of the lowest fares in the country, $450 by birth – so low that many said it would not be worth accepting Medical the patients. In response, the governor Gavin Newsom last month increased its proposal to $1,154much higher than in most other states.

For some, that still won’t be enough in a state where the cost of living is high and the workload is limited by the unpredictability and length of doula work. Many doulas can only serve two or three clients a month because the job often requires them to be on call.

“I’m totally unimpressed,” said Samsarah Morgan, a doula from Oakland who has been in the business for over 40 years. “That’s not a living wage for someone doing this job.”

The rate in other states that offer doula services through Medicaid is generally between $770 and $900. Oregon join this month Rhode Island by offering the highest rate, $1,500 by birth.

California legislators passed a budget June 13. Once the governor has signed off on the new spending plan, Medical coverage for doula services will take effect in January 2023 and the cost $10.8 million a year. California would pay approximately $4.2 millionand the rest would be covered by the federal government.

“We recognize the value of the work that doulas provide to mothers and infants, particularly the intensity of services and duration of doulas,” the state said. Department of Health Serviceswho administers Medicalwritten in a May 13 email to a group of doulas and researchers advising the department on the new benefit.

Doulas act as coaches, guiding families through pregnancy and advocating for them in the hospital during labor and delivery, as well as the postpartum period. Doula services have been associated with better birth outcomes, such as lower rates of C-sections, more breastfeeding, and fewer babies born underweight.

Doulas also serve women undergoing abortions or miscarriages — something the Doula Advisory Group hopes the state will agree to cover in the future.

However, it is difficult to know how

many doulas work in California because the domain is not regulated. Most of their work is for patients who pay out of pocket, up to $3,500 depending on the location and the experience of the doula.

Advocates hope that adding doulas to covered Medi-Cal services could help reduce maternal mortality rates, especially for black mothers, who die due to childbirth at a rate nearly three times higher than that of white mothers.

During the negotiations, the doulas sought as much as $3,600 for each pregnancy and for maternal support for one year after birth. They wanted $1,000 to assist in labor and delivery and $100 each for up to six sessions before birth and 20 sessions postpartum.

Under the Governor’s latest proposal, the state would pay $126.31 for a first visit and $60.48 up to eight shorter subsequent visits. Labor and delivery would be reimbursed at $544.28. The state or Medical insurers may approve additional visits.

The Newsom administration set compensation for doula labor and delivery at the same rate as doctors and midwives. “This proposal recognizes that although doulas have less formal training than a licensed practitioner, doula services are different and generally last much longer than a visit or birth event with a licensed practitioner,” said writes the state in the May 13 email, the authenticity of which has been confirmed by KHN.

Doulas could have negotiated a flat rate with the administration, but thought charging for each visit would be fairer to workers, said Anu Manchikanti Gómez, associate professor at the School of Social Welfare to University of California, Berkeley who is studying doula programs in California. The downside, however, is that some doulas may not earn full price if their clients do not use all of their allotted visits before or after the birth.

“Because the rate of perinatal visits is so low, it doesn’t make a huge difference overall in terms of state spending,” Gómez said. “But $900 versus. $1,100 could be extremely important for a doula.

Although the reimbursement rate was lower than what the doulas were asking for, some said it still represented progress. Khefri Riley, a Los Angeles doula who helped negotiate the new rates, said he introduced doula services in Medical could create a pathway for new workers from birth to enter the profession. “The needle was moved a little bit,” Riley said.

Others said the new rate is more acceptable but the numbers are still tight for doulas. Chantel Runnels serves customers in the Inland Empire and can travel over 100 miles round trip for patients. With gas prices above $6 a gallon, Runnels said, “everyone feels the pressure.”

Some doulas report that local governments and private insurance programs pay even more. A pilot doula program in Los Angeles paid up to $2,300 by birth, and one on Riverside paid up to $1,250.

“We live in one of the most expensive states, and I think there are a lot of big wins in the review that reflect that they listen to the nature of doula work,” Runnels said. “There is still a lot of room for improvement.”

State governments will often determine what is reasonable by checking rates in other states. California looked Oregonwho offered $350 by birth. But that rate was so low that few doulas were willing to accept Medicaid patients.

Then, on June 8, Oregon announced that it would start paying doulas $1,500 by birth. Raeben Nolan, Vice President of the Oregon Doula Associationsaid the increase was the product of seven or eight years of lobbying.

Nolan said California originally raced Oregon basically with his first proposal. Now she’s applauding California’s turnaround.

“I love that they have so many paid visits,” Nolan said. “I think it’s really good.”

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California bill would require gun owners to carry liability insurance https://tinigard.info/california-bill-would-require-gun-owners-to-carry-liability-insurance/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:39:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/california-bill-would-require-gun-owners-to-carry-liability-insurance/ California would be the first state to require gun owners to carry liability insurance to cover the negligent or accidental use of their firearms, if lawmakers approve a measure announced Thursday. “Guns kill more people than cars. Yet gun owners are not required to carry liability insurance like car owners are required to be,” Democratic […]]]>

California would be the first state to require gun owners to carry liability insurance to cover the negligent or accidental use of their firearms, if lawmakers approve a measure announced Thursday. “Guns kill more people than cars. Yet gun owners are not required to carry liability insurance like car owners are required to be,” Democratic Senator Nancy Skinner said in a statement. She said the costs of gun violence should not be borne by taxpayers, survivors, families, employers and communities: “It’s time for gun owners to do their fair share.” (Video player above: Top Stories from June 16, 2022.) New York State is considering a similar requirement following numerous recent mass shootings and an increase in firearms In January, the city of San Jose in Silicon Valley approved what is believed to be the first such insurance requirement in the United States. No insurance company will cover the misuse of a firearm, predicted Sam Paredes, executive director of Gun Owners of California. He said such requirements are an illegal violation of the constitutional rights of gun owners. “We don’t think you can put precursors to the exercise of a constitutional right,” Paredes said. “By forcing someone to take out insurance to exercise their right to own and bear arms, it ceases to make it a right.” Skinner amends an existing bill on another topic to allow gun owners to be held civilly liable if their firearms are used to cause property damage, injury or death. The bill would require also that gun owners have insurance that covers loss or damage resulting from the negligent or accidental use of their firearm.And they should keep proof of insurance with their firearm and show it to the police if they are arrested for any reason. Paredes had similar objections to a second bill that would also affect gun owner costs, this one by imposing an excise tax on firearms and ammunition. The bill would impose an excise tax equal to 10% of the sale price of a handgun and 11% of the sale price of a long gun, ammunition or parts to make firearms . Democratic Congressman Marc Levine estimated that his bill would raise more than $118 million a year for violence prevention programs. Because it would impose a tax, Levine’s bill would require approval by a two-thirds majority in the Legislative Assembly. His similar measure last year fell short by four of the 54 votes he needed in the 80-member Assembly. that would allow individuals to sue those who traffic in illegal weapons.

California would be the first state to require gun owners to carry liability insurance to cover the negligent or accidental use of their firearms, if lawmakers approve a measure announced Thursday.

“Guns kill more people than cars. Yet gun owners are not required to carry liability insurance like car owners are required to be,” Democratic state Sen. Nancy Skinner said in a statement.

She said the costs of gun violence should not be borne by taxpayers, survivors, families, employers and communities: “It’s time for gun owners to do their fair share.”

(Video player above: Top Stories from June 16, 2022.)

New York State is considering a similar requirement following numerous recent mass shootings and an increase in gun violence.

In January, the Silicon Valley city of San Jose approved what is believed to be the first such insurance requirement in the United States.

No insurance company will cover the misuse of a firearm, predicted Sam Paredes, executive director of Gun Owners of California.

He said such requirements are an illegal violation of the constitutional rights of gun owners.

“We don’t think you can put precursors to the exercise of a constitutional right,” Paredes said. “By requiring someone to have insurance in order to exercise their right to own and bear arms, it ceases to make it a right.”

Skinner amends an existing bill on another subject to allow gun owners to be held civilly liable if their firearms are used to cause property damage, injury or death.

The bill would also require gun owners to carry insurance to cover loss or damage resulting from the careless or accidental use of their firearm. And they should keep proof of insurance with their firearm and show it to the police if they are arrested for any reason.

Paredes had similar objections to a second bill that would also affect gun owner costs, this one by imposing an excise tax on firearms and ammunition.

The bill would impose an excise tax equal to 10% of the sale price of a handgun and 11% of the sale price of a long gun, ammunition or parts to manufacture handguns. fire.

Democratic Congressman Marc Levine estimated that his bill would raise more than $118 million a year that would go to gun violence prevention programs.

Because it would impose a tax, Levine’s bill would require the approval of two-thirds majorities in the Legislative Assembly. His similar measure last year was four votes short of the 54 he needed in the 80-member Assembly.

The bills are among several gun measures being considered by California lawmakers this year, including one that would make it easier to prosecute gun manufacturers and another that would allow individuals to sue those who traffic guns. illegal weapons.

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US extends Medicaid for new mothers, even as it rejects broader expansion | Health News from the Healthiest Communities https://tinigard.info/us-extends-medicaid-for-new-mothers-even-as-it-rejects-broader-expansion-health-news-from-the-healthiest-communities/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:52:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/us-extends-medicaid-for-new-mothers-even-as-it-rejects-broader-expansion-health-news-from-the-healthiest-communities/ Until last year, Georgia’s Medicaid coverage for low-income new moms was 60 days. That meant many women’s Medicaid benefits expired before they could be referred to other medical providers for help with serious health issues, said Dr. Keila Brown, OB -GYN in Atlanta. “If they needed other postpartum issues tracked, it was kind of hard […]]]>

Until last year, Georgia’s Medicaid coverage for low-income new moms was 60 days.

That meant many women’s Medicaid benefits expired before they could be referred to other medical providers for help with serious health issues, said Dr. Keila Brown, OB -GYN in Atlanta. “If they needed other postpartum issues tracked, it was kind of hard to get them into that limited time frame,” said Brown, who works at Family Health Centers of Georgia, a group of health centers community.

Georgia is one of twelve states that opted out of fully expanding Medicaid — the federal state health insurance program for people with low incomes or disabilities — under the Affordable Care Act. But nine of those states, mostly in the South, have requested or plan to request an extension of postpartum Medicaid coverage, in many cases to a full year after a birth.

Some have taken advantage of a provision in the American Rescue Plan Act that allows states to expand coverage using a state Medicaid plan amendment, an easier path than seeking a federal waiver. The option is currently available for states only until March 31, 2027.

Extensions have political connotations. Some maternal health advocates say the new postpartum benefits could open the door for Medicaid expansion in some states. But other advocates say the extensions provide coverage for lawmakers who don’t want to fully expand Medicaid, which would give longer-lasting insurance coverage to these low-income women and others.

Lawmakers, doctors and patient advocates cite high rates of maternal mortality as a reason to expand maternity coverage – as well as the positive impacts this could have on women’s health in general.

Maternal health is on the minds of policy analysts, doctors and advocates because the United States Supreme Court appears poised to upend abortion policy nationwide. States across the country, many of them in the South, plan to restrict abortion access if the court overturns its 1973 ruling Roe vs. Wade decision, which established the right to abortion. New limits on access to abortion could mean an increase in the number of women who continue their pregnancies and need postpartum care.

Nearly 2 in 3 pregnancy-related deaths are preventable, and 1 in 3 occur a week to a year after childbirth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many of these deaths are associated with chronic health conditions, and black and indigenous women are more likely to die than white women.

Medicaid pays about 42% of births in the United States, so health advocates suggest expanding the insurance program to reach more mothers for longer would improve maternal health and save more lives.

“You can’t solve all the problems in a year, but I think you can have a much better grip on some of these problems in a year than you could in six to eight weeks – especially when those six to eight weeks were pretty much dominated by new infant care,” Zite said.

Policy experts say moving to one year of postpartum Medicaid coverage, while important, only solves part of the maternal health puzzle.

“Many of these are conditions — for example, hypertension, cardiovascular disease — that need to be treated before a woman becomes pregnant,” said Joan Alker, a research professor at Georgetown University McCourt School of Medicine. Public Policy.

And women, whether pregnant or new mothers, can more easily get treatment for these conditions in Medicaid expansion states, Alker said. A 2020 study found that mothers in states that had expanded Medicaid coverage had better health outcomes than those in states without expansion.

Dr. Bonzo Reddick, a family physician in Savannah, Georgia, said Medicaid expansion is also reducing the demand for abortions. “To prevent many abortions, you have to make contraception available to people,” he said.

In a 2021 briefing note, federal health researchers said about 20% of people with pregnancy-related Medicaid become uninsured within six months of giving birth, including in states that have fully expanded Medicaid. The percentage is almost double in non-expanding states.

This decline in coverage is why states as politically diverse as California, Oregon, Kentucky, Ohio, and Louisiana—all states that have expanded Medicaid—instituted maternal coverage expansion. of 12 months. According to a federal estimate, as many as 720,000 women across the country would be eligible if all states adopted the longer coverage.

There are rumors that postpartum extensions may cause non-expanding states to take the next step. “In states that have enacted expansion, you’re building the political will and momentum to reach a point of Medicaid expansion,” said Taylor Platt, health policy researcher at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

But some health officials are hesitant to interpret the popularity of extended benefits too much.

“Postpartum moms are a group that politicians on all sides will do well to support,” said Christian Soura, executive vice president of the South Carolina Hospital Association. Expanding postpartum coverage could complicate efforts to get South Carolina lawmakers to fully expand Medicaid, Soura said. Peeling off a small, non-controversial group for extended coverage leaves what he called the “least politically sympathetic” groups exposed.

Republican lawmakers in states who have pushed for the postpartum extension in other states said they encountered considerable resistance from some members of their party.

“There are those who absolutely do not want to expand Medicaid in any form or fashion in the state,” said Republican state Rep. Debbie Wood of Alabama. Wood said she supports legislation that would have permanently extended postpartum coverage in Alabama from 60 days to a full year. The bill didn’t pass, but lawmakers ended up investing $4 million in the state budget for a pilot program.

In Georgia, expanding postpartum coverage has taken years of behind-the-scenes work and lobbying by fellow Republicans, said state Rep. Sharon Cooper, who has been pushing for change. “In a perfect world, everyone would have some form of health insurance in one way or another. But it’s not a perfect world,” said Cooper, who chairs a health care committee of the House. “And if a year is what I have, I’ll take a year.”

Some states that haven’t expanded Medicaid — like Wyoming, South Dakota, and Mississippi — lack the political will to expand postpartum care. “We’ve been very clear that we’re just not for Medicaid expansion,” Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn told Mississippi Public Broadcasting recently. “It’s arguably an extension of Medicaid, certainly an extension of coverage.”

More work needs to be done to boost coverage in the postpartum period, maternal health advocates said. They would like the expedited extension option to be available beyond 2027 and for one year of coverage for new moms to become a permanent requirement for all states.

This story was produced by KHN (Kaiser Health News), a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues and a major operational program at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). It was published with permission.

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California budget: Big surplus, big differences https://tinigard.info/california-budget-big-surplus-big-differences/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:55:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/california-budget-big-surplus-big-differences/ In summary Beating Wednesday’s deadline, Democratic lawmakers pushed through a plan to spend California’s record budget surplus, but key negotiations remain with Governor Newsom. There are major differences on gas tax relief, education, mental health and more. California lawmakers today approved a $300 billion state budget, but it’s far from final as legislative leaders continue […]]]>

In summary

Beating Wednesday’s deadline, Democratic lawmakers pushed through a plan to spend California’s record budget surplus, but key negotiations remain with Governor Newsom. There are major differences on gas tax relief, education, mental health and more.


California lawmakers today approved a $300 billion state budget, but it’s far from final as legislative leaders continue to negotiate with Governor Gavin Newsom on issues including a proposed rebate. billions of dollars to taxpayers.

The legislature passed the record spending plan anyway, to meet a constitutional requirement that MPs must pass a balanced budget by Wednesday or forfeit their salaries. The bill will be sent this week to Newsom, who then has 12 days to sign it or veto it – another critical deadline that should propel the two sides towards an agreement.

The start of the next fiscal year is looming on July 1, in less than three weeks. Still, the budget process will likely stretch well beyond that date as lawmakers pass follow-on measures changing the provisions of their spending plan to reflect compromises with the governor. That’s what happened last year, when Newsom and legislative leaders announced a deal in late June and continued to put the finishing touches on it in August.

Newsom and the Democratic-controlled Legislature share general values ​​for state spending, and their budget proposals have broadly similar frameworks. But with an unprecedented amount of cash at their disposal – a surprisingly strong recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, particularly among the wealthiest Californians, has produced a discretionary surplus of nearly $49 billion, officials estimate. ‘State – they still have to agree on many details.

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, a Democrat from Berkeley who leads the Senate Budget Committee, said the Legislature agreed more than 95% with Newsom and she expects them to come to a conclusion soon. consensus.

“I like these kind of negotiations,” she said in an interview. “Our prospects are so aligned that we are in good shape.”

The budget bill approved by the Legislative Assembly today includes approximately $236 billion in general fund spending, with the rest coming from special funds. It would increase state budget reserves to nearly $38 billion, increase pay rates for state-subsidized child care providers, and expand eligibility for Medi-Cal, the child care program. state health insurance for the poor, to all adults, regardless of immigration status, by the start. of 2024.

Under the legislative plan, California would spend $1.7 billion over the next few years to bolster its health care and human services workforce, as well as $100 million to develop generic insulin. and $100 million to establish trust funds for low-income children who have lost their parents. or caregivers to COVID-19.

Anticipating a U.S. Supreme Court ruling as early as this month that would overturn constitutional abortion rights protections and potentially bring a wave of women to California for care, state leaders want to dramatically expand the access to abortion. The budget would provide more than $130 million to train more providers, improve clinic infrastructure and safety, reimburse providers who care for people without health coverage, and create a statewide fund to help patients pay their travel expenses.

The Legislature massively adopted the measure, by 57 votes to 16 in the Assembly and 28 to 8 in the Senate. Republicans complained that not enough of the surplus was being directed to struggling Californians and fiscal reserve accounts, especially with a possible economic downturn looming.

“As the state coffers are growing, family bank accounts are shrinking,” said Assemblyman Vince Fong, a Republican from Bakersfield, on the floor of the Assembly. “California people are rightly frustrated. They pay more and receive less. Government spending continues to rise, but the problems are getting worse and the crises are unresolved.

Learn more about the lawmakers mentioned in this story

State Assembly, District 34 (Bakersfield)

How he voted 2019-2020

Liberal
Conservative

District 34 Demographics

Race/Ethnicity

latin

38%

White

48%

Asian

6%

Black

5%

Multi-race

3%

Voting register

Dem

28%

G.O.P.

44%

no party

21%

Other

6%

Campaign Contributions

Asm. Vince Fong took at least
$473,000
from Finance, insurance and real estate
sector since he was elected to the Legislative Assembly. This represents
14%
of his total campaign contributions.

State Senate, District 9 (Oakland)

How she voted 2019-2020

Liberal
Conservative

District 9 Demographics

Race/Ethnicity

latin

26%

White

32%

Asian

21%

Black

16%

Multi-race

5%

Voting register

Dem

68%

G.O.P.

6%

no party

22%

Other

4%

Campaign Contributions

Senator Nancy Skinner took at least
$1.6 million
from Work
sector since being elected to the Legislative Assembly. This represents
26%
of his total campaign contributions.

The biggest remaining dispute between Newsom and legislative leaders is over competing proposals to relieve Californians from soaring gas prices and inflation. The governor has pushed to send every registered vehicle owner in the state a $400 debit card — up to two per person — at a cost of about $9 billion.

But Democratic lawmakers want to focus the rebate on low- and middle-income families earning less than $250,000 for a couple or $125,000 for an individual. Their plan would reduce checks by $200 for each eligible taxpayer and their dependents, up to $800 for a household, at a cost of about $8 billion.

The two sides agreed on a $21 billion climate package, but have yet to work out how exactly that money should be split between drought relief, wildfire preparedness, zero-vehicle incentives emission, clear energy development and other programs.

Other lingering disagreements center on higher levels of new spending proposed in the Legislature’s budget compared to the governor’s plan. During a Senate budget hearing last week, Erika Li, deputy budget director at Newsom’s Department of Finance, voiced her opposition to the billions of dollars in ongoing additional spending that lawmakers are seeking for universities, housing and social protection programs.

“Given the uncertainty in the economy and rising inflation, we are concerned that the Legislature’s budget will commit an unsustainable amount to current expenditures,” Li said.

These legislative proposals include increasing the state working income tax credit, a tool to return money to low-income working parents, to at least $255 starting in 2023. The change would cost at least $400 million a year.

Lawmakers want to increase base funding for the University of California and California State University by $150 million more than Newsom and pour hundreds of millions more in financial aid, expanding the assists approximately 150,000 newly eligible students. They would also spend an additional $2 billion on student housing projects over the next three years.

The Legislature is pushing to create a new homeownership assistance program, setting aside $1 billion a year for the next decade to subsidize down payments for first-time buyers, who would eventually pay the money back into a loan fund autonomous. Newsom did not endorse that idea, nor the billions of dollars in additional funding lawmakers have proposed for affordable housing development and homeless services.

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Hourly.io Raises $27M in Series A Funding Round https://tinigard.info/hourly-io-raises-27m-in-series-a-funding-round/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:02:33 +0000 https://tinigard.info/hourly-io-raises-27m-in-series-a-funding-round/ Schedule.ioa worker compensation and payroll startup, raised $27M in Series A funding led by Glilot Capital Partners via its Glilot+ seed fund. Additional backers include previous investors Uppercase letters, MS&AD companies, J Ventures and new to this round, Vintage Investment Partners and Result companies. The Series A funding will help Hourly expand beyond the state […]]]>

Schedule.ioa worker compensation and payroll startup, raised $27M in Series A funding led by Glilot Capital Partners via its Glilot+ seed fund. Additional backers include previous investors Uppercase letters, MS&AD companies, J Ventures and new to this round, Vintage Investment Partners and Result companies.

The Series A funding will help Hourly expand beyond the state of California, where it was founded. The company aims to expand its insurance platform nationwide.

Hourly’s user-friendly platform merges three complex products: time and attendance, payand work accident insurance— in one.

Traditionally, companies use annual payroll estimates to calculate workers’ compensation premiums. But changes in personnel, workload, hours or compensation often cause these estimates to vary considerably from reality. As a result, companies overpay or underpay their workers’ compensation premiums, often by tens of thousands of dollars.

Co-founder and CEO Tom Sagi experienced these issues firsthand while running a small business himself. He teamed up with Shay Litvak, a technologist with over 20 years of experience, to solve these problems and revolutionize the $50 billion worker compensation industry.

Lior Litwak, Managing Partner of Glilot+, Glilot Capital’s early growth fund, said, “Hourly.io is a game-changer for small businesses with a mobile workforce. The platform frees up thousands of hours spent on administrative work, eliminates surprise bills, and ultimately improves accountability. We are thrilled to join Hourly in its journey to completely revamp the workers’ compensation insurance industry.

Haim Sadger, a founding partner at S Capital who led Hourly’s seed round in 2019 and is the second-largest Series A investor, said: “Hourly is a shining example of what can be done when people talents come together with a clear vision. This vision is to create a platform that allows any business owner to manage all aspects of their hourly workforce in minutes using just a smartphone. They’ve built something really special, and the growth and positive feedback they’re seeing in the market is proof of that.”

“Schedule completely eliminates uncertainty because payroll and worker compensation are linked. Now companies know exactly how much their coverage costs,” Sagi said. “We’re excited to expand Hourly outside of California and give business owners across America a better way to pay their team, get a handle on their true labor costs, and better manage the insurance of their employees.”

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Can California continue to offer cheap health care? Here’s what the new CEO of the state network says [The Sacramento Bee] – InsuranceNewsNet https://tinigard.info/can-california-continue-to-offer-cheap-health-care-heres-what-the-new-ceo-of-the-state-network-says-the-sacramento-bee-insurancenewsnet/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 12:54:53 +0000 https://tinigard.info/can-california-continue-to-offer-cheap-health-care-heres-what-the-new-ceo-of-the-state-network-says-the-sacramento-bee-insurancenewsnet/ Can California continue to offer cheap health care?  Here’s what the new CEO of the state network says [The Sacramento Bee] – InsuranceNewsNetJessica Altman took over in March as general manager of Covered California, and even as she settled into a new home in Sacramento she was also touring congressional leaders to convey how much Californians want access to health insurance. Too often the biggest obstacle to getting it is cost, Altman said in his first interview […]]]> Can California continue to offer cheap health care?  Here’s what the new CEO of the state network says [The Sacramento Bee] – InsuranceNewsNet

Jessica Altman took over in March as general manager of Covered California, and even as she settled into a new home in Sacramento she was also touring congressional leaders to convey how much Californians want access to health insurance.

Too often the biggest obstacle to getting it is cost, Altman said in his first interview with The Sacramento Beeand nothing underscored that more than the capped enrollment record in California last year when new federal aid in the US bailout reduced premiums for California enrolled by 20% on average.

Enrollment in plans offered in the California state market jumped to 1.8 million, according to Covered California records, an increase of more than 150,000.

Altman said she must continue to share the story that the financial assistance put in place under the U.S. bailout is having a staggering impact for all Americans who rely on state and federal markets to provide them with a lifeline when they or their family members are unexpectedly struck down by illness and to get the preventive care they need to stay healthy. Federal grants have only been approved for 2022 policies.

“Health care is essential,” she said, “and being healthy is essential to our ability to live happy, healthy lives and pursue the things we want to pursue. It is also, within our society, a great equalizer if used effectively and equitably to support people across our country and in California.

In other words, Altman said, Covered California’s job isn’t done when a consumer pays a premium.

“Our role as a marketplace doesn’t just end when people are covered,” she said. “It goes to what happens next. Does health insurance provide the access people need. Do they have the suppliers they need? Are providers providing high-quality care that actually gives them better health outcomes? So this next phase of accountability (is) not just access to coverage, but access to quality and equitable care.

A native of California, Altman was the state insurance commissioner of Pennsylvania before taking the top job at Covered California. Altman takes the reins of Peter V. Leefounding leader of the marketplace since 2012.

She offered insight into her top priorities during a Q&A with The Bee. We asked what his top three priorities were at the start of his tenure.

Continuously improve the customer experience

The top priority will always be consumer-centric? How can Covered California better serve the customers we have today, better reach the customers we may have tomorrow, and better serve them as they navigate our health care system, which can be too complex.

An example: how can we better support Californians as they transition between types of coverage – whether Medical to private insurers, from COBRA to a covered California insurer, or between plans within covered California or other types of transitions.

What outreach tools and infrastructure do we have to identify these people when they need us and to support them in these processes?

Go further with diversity, equity and inclusion

Fairness is an integral part of our mission. It’s something Covered California has always done. Are providers delivering high-quality care that actually delivers better health outcomes for all enrollees?

This next phase of accountability is not just about access to coverage, but access to quality and equitable care.

There are many things we do from an equity perspective, for example, our outreach to community organizations, our efforts to be included in different communities through California to provide customer service, our desire to be known and understood in all languages ​​and cultures, and our work to ensure that the providers who are part of the network of health plans we contract with are culturally diverse competent and meet the health care needs of our entire population.

“Our work does not stop at the cover”

Our work doesn’t stop at the cover. It comes down to quality.

Over the next few years, we will monitor the performance of our health plans on six key quality measures. We will see our health plans put financial responsibility on the table (pay penalties) if they do not meet the targets of these quality measures.

We talk about things like: How many children they cover receive vaccinations? How many adults undergo life-saving colorectal screenings at the appropriate age? How do they manage to monitor their population’s blood sugar levels and hypertension and improve them? These are the things we know are the drivers of morbidity and mortality.

Incidentally, we will collect and review these metrics not only holistically, but also stratified by demographic factors such as race and ethnicity to ensure we understand any disparities.

Our fairness work and our quality work are both the same and much more than the other. What I mean by that is that quality health care equals equity. Ensuring quality health care will help us achieve equitable outcomes.

What makes you want to do this job?

I come from a family that has worked in health care and is steeped in health care. My dad’s dad was a primary care doctor I remember well, doing house calls even in his 80s with his black leather doctor’s bag and stethoscope. My mother’s father was an obstetrician-gynecologist who provided women’s health services in a very different time.

And both of my parents worked in healthcare and had long careers in healthcare.

The issues hit me close to home both because I saw my family members and loved ones giving their lives and commitment to improving the health care of others and also (because) I seen too many people I love experiencing health issues. I have always been pushed towards the public service, I have never worked elsewhere than in the public service.

©2022 The Sacramento Bee. Visit sacbee.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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