California Insurance – Tinigard http://tinigard.info/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 03:44:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tinigard.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png California Insurance – Tinigard http://tinigard.info/ 32 32 Roseburg Forest Products sued over deadly fire in Weed, California https://tinigard.info/roseburg-forest-products-sued-over-deadly-fire-in-weed-california/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:52:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/roseburg-forest-products-sued-over-deadly-fire-in-weed-california/ A wood products company is being sued over the deadly factory fire that occurred in Siskiyou County this year. Previous coverage in the video player above Lawyers say Springfield, Oregon-based Roseburg Forest Products and other companies prioritized profits over safety, according to court documents filed Nov. 18. They claim their actions resulted in severe property […]]]>

A wood products company is being sued over the deadly factory fire that occurred in Siskiyou County this year. Previous coverage in the video player above Lawyers say Springfield, Oregon-based Roseburg Forest Products and other companies prioritized profits over safety, according to court documents filed Nov. 18. They claim their actions resulted in severe property damage and killed two people. The factory fire erupted Sept. 2 at company facilities in the small town of Weed on Interstate 5, about 280 miles northeast of San Francisco. . According to Cal Fire, it burned just under 4,000 acres and flattened over 100 structures. Watch coverage from the day the fire started in the video player below. . | Learn more | A machine failure may have caused a fatal fire in Weed, according to the company Roseburg Forest Products said in September that its factory generates its own electricity in a cogeneration facility fueled by leftover wood, and the ash that is ejected is pulverized with water cooling by a " machine supplied by a third party." are behind the lawsuit against the company, Benjamin Hornsby – Roseburg’s security officer, Jeffery Lee – Roseburg’s director of operations and “Does 1-100”, according to court documents. The factory employs 145 people, although not all of them were on duty at the time, a spokesperson told KCRA 3 at the time. Read the full complaint here. The plaintiffs are suing the company for damages. | Related | 2 people killed in weed factory fire are identified KCRA 3 has contacted Roseburg Forest Products, but has not yet received a response at the time of publication. Roseburg Forest Products Co. also announced in September that although the Until the investigation is complete, she planned to provide up to $50 million for a community restoration fund. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

A wood products company is being sued for the deadly factory fire that occurred in Siskiyou County this year.

  • Previous coverage in the video player above

Lawyers say Roseburg Forest Products, which is based in Springfield, Ore., and other companies prioritized profits over safety, according to court documents filed Nov. 18. They claim their actions resulted in severe property damage and killed two people.

The factory fire erupted Sept. 2 at the company’s facility in the small town of Weed on Interstate 5, about 280 miles northeast of San Francisco. According to Cal Fire, it burned just under 4,000 acres and flattened over 100 structures. Watch coverage from the day the fire broke out in the video player below.

Days after the fire erupted, the lumber company said it was investigating whether the blaze was caused by a possible failure of a water spray system used to cool the ashes in its veneer factory.

| Learn more | Machine failure may have caused fatal fire in weed grinder, company says

Roseburg Forest Products said in September that its plant generated its own electricity in a cogeneration facility fueled by leftover wood, and the ejected ash was sprayed with cooling water by a “machine supplied by a third party”.

Court documents claim that fires had previously broken out daily at the plant due to hot ash created from wood chips, saying the risk of drilling was clear.

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

Eight people whose property was destroyed in the fire are behind the lawsuit against the company, Benjamin Hornsby – Roseburg’s security manager, Jeffery Lee – Roseburg’s director of operations and “Does 1-100”, according to court documents.

The factory employs 145 people, although not all of them were on duty at the time, a spokesperson told KCRA 3 at the time.

Read the full complaint here.

The plaintiffs are suing the company for damages.

| Related | 2 people killed in Mill Fire from Weed are identified

KCRA 3 has contacted Roseburg Forest Products, but has not yet received a response as of press time.

Roseburg Forest Products Co. also announced in September that although the investigation is not complete, it plans to provide up to $50 million for a community restoration fund.


The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Here’s what we know about California’s 2022 election results https://tinigard.info/heres-what-we-know-about-californias-2022-election-results/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 00:16:31 +0000 https://tinigard.info/heres-what-we-know-about-californias-2022-election-results/ Updated November 18, 3:45 p.m. From the gubernatorial race to who will represent the Sacramento area in the state Legislature, California voters have been asked to contest a number of key positions in the 2022 midterm elections. Here’s a look at what we know about the results of some of the state’s major races on […]]]>

Updated November 18, 3:45 p.m.

From the gubernatorial race to who will represent the Sacramento area in the state Legislature, California voters have been asked to contest a number of key positions in the 2022 midterm elections. Here’s a look at what we know about the results of some of the state’s major races on Friday afternoon.

Results for most races may not be finalized for several days as mail-in ballots continue to arrive at county election offices for processing.

CapRadio and NPR rely on The Associated Press for race calls. Here’s information on how the process works and what to expect with results in the next few days.

See the full California election results here and learn more about the state proposal results here.

Statewide offices

Governor

Gavin Newsom will get another term as governor of California after being re-elected, according to a race call from The Associated Press.

Newsom led Republican challenger Brian Dahle, a state senator from rural Northern California, 59-41% on Friday afternoon. The AP called the race just after polls closed on Election Day. After defeating a recall election in 2021, Newsom was in a comfortable position this cycle. He has spent much of the campaign trail this fall championing other Democratic candidates and causes, including a ballot proposal to add abortion rights to the California constitution.

US Senate

Alex Padilla (D) won his first full term in the US Senate after being nominated to fill the seat vacated by Vice President Kamala Harris. It was being contested by attorney Mark Meuser (R). Padilla is actually on the ballot twice, once to complete the rest of Harris’ term and once for his first full term. The AP called both runs for Padilla.

Attorney General

Incumbent Rob Bonta (D) will remain as California attorney general, according to a race appeal from The Associated Press. Bonta got about 59% of the vote Friday afternoon, with challenger Nathan Hochman (R) at 41% with about 87% of the vote expected, according to the AP.

Bonta was appointed to that position by Newsom in early 2021. He replaced Xavier Becerra, who was appointed to a cabinet position in the Biden administration. Hochman is a former federal prosecutor who has never held public office before.

Controller

Democrat Malia Cohen won the race for state comptroller, according to a race call from The Associated Press. Cohen had around 55% of the vote on Friday with Republican Lanhee Chen at 45% with about 86% of the vote expected.

Cohen currently serves on the California Board of Equalization. She is also a former San Francisco supervisor. Chen, a Stanford University professor who has been endorsed by former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and editorial boards such as the Los Angeles Times and San Francisco Chronicle, was seen as a potential candidate. to be the first Republican to hold statewide office in California since 2006.

Congress

3rd congressional district

Republican Assemblyman Kevin Kiley won 52% of the vote, against 48% for Democrat Dr. Kermit Jones, a doctor and Navy veteran. About 64% of the votes had been counted by Friday afternoon.

Kiley and Jones compete to represent a huge new congressional district that stretches from Plumas County to Death Valley. It also includes the Sacramento-area suburbs of Rocklin, Roseville, and Folsom.

9th Congress District

Josh Harder, an incumbent Democrat, got 56% of the vote while Republican and San Joaquin County Supervisor Tom Patti got 44%. About 80% of the votes had been counted by Friday afternoon.

The 9th district includes Stockton, Lodi, Tracy and Manteca.

State Legislative Assembly

8th Senate District

Angelique Ashby, a member of the Sacramento City Council, obtained 51% of the vote against 49% for the former California insurance commissioner, Dave Jones. With 85% of the votes on Friday afternoon, the race was still too close to be announced.

The two Democrats are in a fierce and expensive race to replace incumbent Senator Richard Pan. An infusion of freelance spending in the final weeks of the campaign led to a flurry of negative mail and ads targeting both candidates.

The seat represents the cities of Sacramento and Elk Grove in the State Senate.

6th Senate District

In the 6th Senate District, former Republican Assemblyman Roger Niello won 53% of the vote to 47% for San Juan Democratic school board member Paula Villescaz. Friday afternoon, 159 174 the votes had been counted. The district includes the Sacramento County communities of Lincoln, Roseville, Folsom, Rancho Cordova, and Galt.

6th Assembly District

Assemblyman Kevin McCarty (D) will serve another term in the state Assembly, according to a race call from The Associated Press. McCarty got 65% of the vote and his challenger, airline pilot Cathy Cook (R), got 35% on Friday with 93% of the expected vote. The district covers Natomas, downtown Sacramento, and the Arden-Arcade area.

7th Assembly District

Republican challenger Josh Hoover has died Iincumbent Assemblyman Ken Cooley by just six votes out of Friday afternoon, 50% to 50%, with the race too close to be announced. According to the AP, about 85% of the expected votes are voted.

Cooley has been in the Legislative Assembly since 2012 and is waiting another two years before reaching the term limit. The district has become more conservative after last year’s redistricting.

10th Assembly District

In another Democrat vs. Democrat race, early results showed Stephanie Nguyen with 54% of the vote while her opponent Eric Guerra had 46%, with about 78% of the vote expected. The race was too close to call with still many ballots. remains to be counted in Sacramento County. Eric Guerra is a Sacramento City Council member and Stephanie Nguyen is an Elk Grove council member who also runs a nonprofit organization.



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McCourt experts challenge the status quo in health equity research https://tinigard.info/mccourt-experts-challenge-the-status-quo-in-health-equity-research/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:03:40 +0000 https://tinigard.info/mccourt-experts-challenge-the-status-quo-in-health-equity-research/ The Center on Health Insurance Reforms (CHIR) at the McCourt School of Public Policy is an independent, nonpartisan policy and research center founded in 2011, where faculty and staff are engaged in research that improves consumer access to affordable health insurance and adequate. Funding to support the work of the CHIR comes from a variety […]]]>

The Center on Health Insurance Reforms (CHIR) at the McCourt School of Public Policy is an independent, nonpartisan policy and research center founded in 2011, where faculty and staff are engaged in research that improves consumer access to affordable health insurance and adequate. Funding to support the work of the CHIR comes from a variety of foundations and organizationsincluding the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, and the Commonwealth Fund, among others.

Following the 2020 murder of George Floyd, CHIR faculty made a pledge to better understand and document the challenges faced by communities of color. Through their research, CHIR experts have asked questions that assess the disparate impacts of policy choices on these communities, adopting data collection practices that proactively seek out diverse voices, and working to develop policies that place the health equity at the forefront.

In a project funded by the National Institute for Health Care ReformCHIR researchers are evaluate efforts improve access to primary care for underserved populations. CHIR Browser Resource Guide, a tool supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and designed to help consumers explore health insurance plans and the benefits available to them under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), has been updated to include content in Spanish and highlight the outreach efforts of organizations working with diverse communities.

Tracking State Efforts to Advance Health Equity

Another long-standing project, funded by the Commonwealth Fund, allows CHIR researchers to monitor and analyze how all 50 states and the District of Columbia are implementing the ACA’s private insurance reforms and improving their health insurance markets. Building on this work, CHIR began monitoring health equity in 2021. Assistant Research Professor Christine Monahan and research fellow Jalisa Clarksupported by 2022 Richmond Foundation Fellow Nadia Stovicektrack state action to address disparities and inequalities in health, health care, and health coverage through reforms and regulation of the private health insurance market.

CHIR researchers found that states like California, Connecticut and Massachusetts have took the lead in promoting health equity by first assessing internal accountability: hiring equity leaders, forming social justice advisory committees, and developing internal plans to ensure that policies and practices of organization advance equity.

Some states have prioritized collecting client demographics to identify and address disparities and target resources appropriately, though state efforts to improve race and ethnicity data collection remain. a work in progress. Several states have also worked with health insurers to create networks of providers and design benefit packages that advance health equity, such as the elimination of cost sharing for diabetes care to address racial disparities in diabetes prevalence and outcomes.

Diversify the health insurance market and the consumer experience

State marketplaces are also responsible for reach out to consumers and help them sign up into a health plan that meets their needs. This includes working with organizations serving communities of color and diversifying the health insurance broker industry to better represent market customers. CHIR is currently investigating how markets meet the needs of people with limited English proficiency who depend on language access services.

“We’re looking at states that run their own health insurance marketplace and get a sense of what the language access landscape looks like, from insurance enrollment applications to staff job descriptions,” said said Nadia Stovicek (MPP’23), who is currently involved in CHIR’s Language Access Survey Project as a research assistant on the health equity team. “Culturally competent care is so important, and language access is a big part of that.

CHIR research is already helping to inform state officials about what other organizations are doing to advance health equity. Federal policymakers can also learn from the CHIR findings as they work to fulfill President Biden’s Executive Order on promoting racial equity and supporting underserved communities.

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Elizabeth Holmes should be sentenced to 15 years in prison for fraud, according to the United States https://tinigard.info/elizabeth-holmes-should-be-sentenced-to-15-years-in-prison-for-fraud-according-to-the-united-states/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 06:55:03 +0000 https://tinigard.info/elizabeth-holmes-should-be-sentenced-to-15-years-in-prison-for-fraud-according-to-the-united-states/ New You can now listen to the Insurance Journal articles! Former Theranos Inc. CEO Elizabeth Holmes is set to spend 15 years in prison for committing one of the most serious white-collar crimes in Silicon Valley history, prosecutors tell the judge who will sentence her . In a motion filed Friday night by the U.S. […]]]>
New You can now listen to the Insurance Journal articles!

Former Theranos Inc. CEO Elizabeth Holmes is set to spend 15 years in prison for committing one of the most serious white-collar crimes in Silicon Valley history, prosecutors tell the judge who will sentence her .

In a motion filed Friday night by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in San Francisco, prosecutors introduced a new element to the closely watched case: a recommendation that Holmes, 38, be ordered to pay off his investors, including Walgreens, in full. Boots Alliance Inc. and Safeway Inc. — sums totaling more than $800 million.

Misleading both novice and sophisticated investors, Holmes was “blinded by ambition,” prosecutors said in a court filing. The founder of the blood-testing startup that reached a peak valuation of $9 billion before collapsing into ruins in 2018 operated in a “reality distortion field,” in which her quest for fame, adoration and billions of dollars of wealth justified tampering and deception that put patient safety at risk, the government said.

“Holmes often seized on investors’ desire to make the world a better place in order to trick them into believing his lies,” prosecutors said. “She stands in court without remorse. She declines all responsibility. On the contrary, she insists that she is the victim.

The government’s sentencing memo sets the stage for a final showdown Nov. 18 in federal court in San Jose, Calif., before U.S. District Judge Edward Davila.

Holmes’ own lawyers say she should be spared jail time and sentenced to house arrest and community service so she can continue her pro bono work advising victims of sexual assault that she has started in recent months. His lawyers have argued that if Davila believes incarceration is necessary, an 18-month sentence is sufficient, followed by supervised release.

The government memo echoes many of the more sensational revelations from Holmes’ trial, including her admission that she added the logos of pharmaceutical giants without permission on reports to potential investors. They also pointed to instances where she falsely boasted that Theranos devices were being used by the US military in combat.

Statements from investors and victim patients are intertwined throughout the memo. Holmes’ lies about Theranos’ contracts with the Department of Defense were designed to “attack investor respect for our servicemen and servicewomen in the armed forces,” said investor Craig Hall. “Put simply, Holmes’ actions were disgusting and un-American.”

Holmes’ scheme to defraud patients should also weigh against her, even though she was acquitted of those charges, prosecutors said. Citing a sentencing recommendation from the U.S. probation office, the government said Holmes should serve more prison time because of his role as a leader in “extensive criminal activity that has occurred in connection with the company she founded.

Prosecutors included a list of investors, with a particular focus on Walgreens, Safeway and the late George Shultz, the former US secretary of state who served on the Theranos board and whose grandson worked in the company. business and was a whistleblower. Shultz’s family submitted a victim impact statement, prosecutors said. Holmes should compensate investors who suffered a total loss of $803,840,309, according to the filing.

Holmes has “modest assets” offset by $450,000 in loans for his civil settlement with securities regulators and more than $30 million in debt for legal fees, prosecutors said. The US Probation Office reported that Holmes’ family “appears to have substantial assets” and that the former CEO “is managing his affairs to avoid having their assets subject to judgment in this case.”

Davila should consider whether this “reflects a genuine desire to make his investors whole,” prosecutors said.

The case is USA v Holmes, 18-cr-00258, US District Court, Northern District of California (San Jose).

Photo: Elizabeth Holmes, founder of Theranos Inc., left, leaves federal court with her husband Billy Evans in San Jose, Calif., October 17, 2022./Bloomberg

Copyright 2022 Bloomberg.

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Alignment Health Plan Launches New CalPlus+ Veterans HMO Plan in California, Home to Largest Veteran Population of Any State – InsuranceNewsNet https://tinigard.info/alignment-health-plan-launches-new-calplus-veterans-hmo-plan-in-california-home-to-largest-veteran-population-of-any-state-insurancenewsnet/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 16:18:35 +0000 https://tinigard.info/alignment-health-plan-launches-new-calplus-veterans-hmo-plan-in-california-home-to-largest-veteran-population-of-any-state-insurancenewsnet/ ORANGE, Calif., November 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Alignment Health, a technology-based Medicare Advantage (MA) insurance company, has added a new HMO Alignment Health Plan option designed to serve the men and women who have proudly served our country. The CalPlus+ Veterans HMO, available to anyone eligible for Medicare residing in one of the 18 […]]]>

ORANGE, Calif., November 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Alignment Health, a technology-based Medicare Advantage (MA) insurance company, has added a new HMO Alignment Health Plan option designed to serve the men and women who have proudly served our country. The CalPlus+ Veterans HMO, available to anyone eligible for Medicare residing in one of the 18 California counties in the Alignment service area, is a $0-premium plan that complements veterans affairs (VA) health care coverage for those who served in active military, naval, or air service and received an honorable discharge.

California is home to 1.8 million veterans, or 8% of the total WE population of veterans.1 Eligible adults can select the plan during the annual Medicare enrollment period, which extends through December 7 for plan benefits commencing January 1, 2023.

CalPlus+ Veterans HMO provides comprehensive medical and prescription drug coverage, with rich additional benefits not traditionally offered by the Virginiasuch as:

  • $0 copayment for visits to the general practitioner and to the specialist outside the Virginia system
  • $600 annual reimbursement of caregivers
  • $150 monthly grocery allowance for members with eligible chronic conditions
  • Up to 20 free one-way trips to plan-approved locations within 80km
  • Free fitness memberships
  • A “Flex” allowance which offers a supplement $600 per year that can be used for important vision, hearing, dental and chiropractic items and services such as dentures, veneers and cupping, provided by in-network and out-of-network providers

“Alignment is proud to serve the brave men and women who have sacrificed so much for our country with our first plan tailored to the needs of our veterans,” said Dawn Maroney, CEO of Alignment Health Plan. “Our CalPlus+ Veterans plan joins our growing line of personalized plans, benefits, and supports to help today’s seniors and Medicare-eligible adults with more value, flexibility, and choice in their care.”

Alignment Health Plan’s HMO CalPlus+ Veterans will be available to Medicare-eligible adults within 18 California counties the Alignment will serve in 2023: Alameda, Fresno, Los Angeles, Madeira, Marine, Orange, Usher, Riverside, Sacramento, Saint Bernardine, San Diego, San Francisco, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara, Stanislas, Ventura and yolo.

Like other Alignment members, CalPlus+ Veteran plan members will have access to the company’s 24/7 ACCESS on-demand concierge, a dedicated concierge team available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to respond health-related issues, scheduling medical appointments and arranging transportation.

Alignment’s diverse portfolio of 2023 plans will be available to 8.3 million Medicare-eligible adults in 52 total markets across Arizona, California, Nevada and North Carolinaas well as two new states — Florida and Texas. New offers include $0-prime Preferred Vendor Organization (PPO), special needs plans for adults eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid, and new benefits to support the lifestyles of today’s seniors. In 2023, the company is also offering new benefits such as a month’s supply of insulin for $35 or less and discounted pet medications.

For more information about the company’s product offerings, visit www.alignmenthealthplan.com.

About Alignment Health
Alignment Health champions a new path in senior care that enables members to age well and live their most vibrant lives. A consumer brand of Health Alignment (NASDAQ: ALHC), Alignment Health is a technology-based Medicare Advantage company that offers more than 40 benefit-rich, value-driven plans that serve 38 counties in four states. The company partners with nationally recognized and trusted local providers to provide coordinated care, powered by its personalized care model, 24/7 concierge team and purpose-built technology, AVA®. Situated at California, the company’s mission-driven team makes high-quality, low-cost care a reality for members every day. As it expands its offerings and expands its national footprint, Alignment maintains its core values ​​of leading with a serving heart and putting seniors first. For more information, visit http://www.alignmenthealth.com.

Media Contact:Priya ShahmPR, Inc. for Alignment Health
[email protected]

Y0141_23460FR_M

1 CalVet, https://www.calvet.ca.gov/veteran-services-benefits

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Source: Alignment Healthcare USA, LLC

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Biden says it will be tough for Democrats to keep the House https://tinigard.info/biden-says-it-will-be-tough-for-democrats-to-keep-the-house/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 11:07:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/biden-says-it-will-be-tough-for-democrats-to-keep-the-house/ (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images) President Joe Biden sought to inflame Democrats on the eve of what he called “one of the most important elections” in people’s lives, urging Democrats to the polls with a reminder of what’s at stake in Tuesday’s election . “Our lives are going to be shaped by what happens over the next […]]]>
(Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

President Joe Biden sought to inflame Democrats on the eve of what he called “one of the most important elections” in people’s lives, urging Democrats to the polls with a reminder of what’s at stake in Tuesday’s election .

“Our lives are going to be shaped by what happens over the next three years,” Biden said Monday night.

Speaking at Bowie State University in Maryland, Biden echoed many of his recent attacks on “Republican MAGA proposals,” “trickle down economics,” and election deniers, warning Maryland voters that the Republican gubernatorial candidate is part of the latter group.

He hailed Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore as “the real deal.”

“He’s a veteran. Scholar of Rhodes. I’ve always worried about the Rhodes Scholars, they’re so smart,” Biden said. “He will be a great and historic Governor of Maryland.”

Biden also urged Maryland voters to re-elect their congressional delegation, saying, “Here in Maryland, you have great people to vote for. Keep them. You need it. I need it.”

President Joe Biden poses for photos with Wes Moore during a campaign rally at Bowie State University on Monday.
President Joe Biden poses for photos with Wes Moore during a campaign rally at Bowie State University on Monday. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Biden spoke of his own “historic commitment” to historically black colleges and universities like Bowie State and said that while HBCUs don’t have the same endowments as many other universities, “you’re just as smart , you’re just as brilliant, you’re as good as any other college in America.

One of the best ways to honor HBCUs “is to vote,” he said.

While most of the crowd enthusiastically supported the president, he was interrupted at least four times during his remarks. At first, Biden told the crowd to “let him sing” when he was briefly interrupted by a protester. At another point, a man wearing a hat shouted something from the upper level of the gymnasium about Hunter Biden and caused further distraction.

“Don’t jump, you look crazy enough to jump,” Biden told the man, who kept shouting indiscriminately.

Another man wearing a similar hat also tried to yell at Biden, followed by another protester. The president continued his speech and was content to speak during the interruptions, but the crowd tried to drown out the protesters by chanting “we love Joe” or “let’s go Joe”.

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Parishioner’s labor of love restores vandalized statue at California church – Catholic World Report https://tinigard.info/parishioners-labor-of-love-restores-vandalized-statue-at-california-church-catholic-world-report/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 20:16:24 +0000 https://tinigard.info/parishioners-labor-of-love-restores-vandalized-statue-at-california-church-catholic-world-report/ Michael Stucchi poses in front of the restored statue of Jesus with Children at St. Mel’s Church in Woodland Hills, California. / Photo credit: Tom Hoffarth. See the CNA article for the full slideshow. Woodland Hills, Calif., Nov. 5, 2022 / 8:00 a.m. (CNA). In the darkness of an early Saturday morning last March 19, […]]]>
Michael Stucchi poses in front of the restored statue of Jesus with Children at St. Mel’s Church in Woodland Hills, California. / Photo credit: Tom Hoffarth. See the CNA article for the full slideshow.

Woodland Hills, Calif., Nov. 5, 2022 / 8:00 a.m. (CNA).

In the darkness of an early Saturday morning last March 19, Father Steve Davoren and his golden lab, Blue, stepped out through the back exit of the parsonage of St. Mel’s Church in Woodland Hills, California, for a race before dawn.

But before he could begin, the priest’s heart sank when he saw what the spotlights pointing at the church’s iconic group of statues of Jesus and three children revealed.

Grainy security footage captured only the arm of a person repeatedly swinging an unidentified weapon at the statues. Pieces have fallen from what has long been a centerpiece of the parish, in a highly visible spot on busy Ventura Boulevard.

Chunks of mottled concrete peeking out from twisted and exposed rebar were everywhere: in the raised flowerbed flanked by white rose bushes, in the parking lot, on the sidewalk next to the parish office.

Davoren immediately called the church’s business manager, Lisa Feliciano, who put on a hoodie and came right over.

“It was awful,” Feliciano said. “But now we were putting pieces in a box, crying. I couldn’t believe anyone could have so much hate for doing this.

Feliciano filed a police report with the surveillance video, which she described as “two minutes of torture.”

“I see it and it still makes me cry,” she said.

Details of damaged statues of Jesus at St. Mel's Church in Woodland Hills, California.  Photo credit: Michael Stucchi
Details of damaged statues of Jesus at St. Mel’s Church in Woodland Hills, California. Photo credit: Michael Stucchi

It fell to Davoren to explain the attack to parishioners the following day during Sunday masses, preaching understanding and forgiveness instead of anger and frustration.

“To me, the irony of it was that the person who did it must have been a broken person themselves,” said Davoren, a pastor at St. Mel’s since 2018. “From the scriptures, we know we need to pray. for people who feel compelled to destroy.”

Michael Stucchi heard Davoren’s message loud and clear this weekend. A systems software engineer by trade, Stucchi found satisfaction working for the parish to restore four church statues in the past as well as statues of Nativity scenes.

He was their humble confidant. But it was something bigger.

“When I spoke to Father Steve about it a few days after it happened, I admit I was angry, angry, outraged because the statues were special to me and my family,” Stucchi said, whose son works in the parish office. “But then I heard his sadness and his concern for the mental state of the person who damaged the statues. It sounds so much like him. It really changed my paradigm from reactive to proactive – to wonder if I could look for ways to fix them.

“Father Steve’s compassion is what Jesus would have us have. Everyone who works here is in the same spirit of love and forgiveness. We have no idea of ​​the terrible things in this person’s life.

Stucchi and Feliciano began the reconstruction by collecting and studying photographs of the statues to examine all of their features. The depiction of Jesus stands about 6 feet tall and weighs about 1,000 pounds; each child on its own concrete base weighs approximately 300 pounds.

The collection dates from the 1950s, when the parish was first built. It was once part of a fountain in front of the school office and was later moved near the west doors of the church in the 1990s when the new parish center was built.

Feliciano had contacted the Archdiocese of Los Angeles about filing an insurance claim and was told the repair could cost up to $30,000.

Stucchi said he could handle it, at no cost to the parish.

This came as no surprise to Feliciano, who calls Stucchi “a true angel”.

“Look at the difference between someone filled with hate and destruction…and then someone like Michael who spends his time showing pure love and joy putting it back together,” Feliciano said. “Both are our neighbours, they live among us. How can there be such a big difference in someone’s heart and soul?

Michael Stucchi has reconstructed the statues at St. Mel's Church in Woodland Hills, California, where they might even be in better shape when finished.  Photo credit: Michael Stucchi
Michael Stucchi has reconstructed the statues at St. Mel’s Church in Woodland Hills, California, where they might even be in better shape when finished. Photo credit: Michael Stucchi

Stucchi experimented with different combinations of compounds – crushed marble, white Portland cement and waterproof exterior grout. Most of the work had to be done on site, with some parts being transported to the garage of his house.

“I was very careful not to make anything worse,” Stucchi said, noting that the materials often dried too quickly in the summer heat, leading to more delays. “The saddest part for me was the damage done to Jesus. We know enough about the pain and suffering that Jesus went through in his life, but to see an image of him erased is too much.

Slowly and meticulously, Stucchi put the statues back to where they might even be in better condition now due to how time and age had already caused cracking and decay before vandalism.

Seven months later, Stucchi still has some finishing touches – and a whole lot of gratitude.

“As the sacrifice and commitment of a priest is beyond my comprehension or ability, after seeing their dedication and that of other volunteers and staff, I felt it was the least I could do,” said said Stucchi. “Nevertheless, the Catholic Church was always there for me when I was a child and young adult.”

From a business perspective, Feliciano said the experience taught him the need for better security. The statues were also vandalized in 2021 when someone painted the faces green, but it was easy enough to repaint them white.

“As a parishioner, Michael’s kindness reminds me that there is kindness in the world,” said Feliciano, who noted the 100-degree days Stucchi spent with the statue last summer. “I remember praying for the person who was filled with enough hate to do the damage and thank God for blessing us and Michael.”

Father Davoren believes that “to some degree we are all broken and damaged, but our faith in God’s love allows people like Michael to have the tenderness to painstakingly piece together these pieces of the statue.

“It’s about giving people the right amount of grace to bounce back in their lives.”

This article has been first published on November 2, 2022in Angelus News and is reproduced with permission.


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Girardi Keese lawyers escape contempt in Lion Air Funds case (1) https://tinigard.info/girardi-keese-lawyers-escape-contempt-in-lion-air-funds-case-1/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://tinigard.info/girardi-keese-lawyers-escape-contempt-in-lion-air-funds-case-1/ Former Girardi Keese lawyers David Lira and Keith Griffin will not be held in contempt for their involvement in the Lion Air crash litigation in which millions of dollars owed to victims were stolen, a judge has heard Chicago Federal, adding that Edelson PC, prosecutors and the state bars will “bring bad actors to account.” […]]]>

Former Girardi Keese lawyers David Lira and Keith Griffin will not be held in contempt for their involvement in the Lion Air crash litigation in which millions of dollars owed to victims were stolen, a judge has heard Chicago Federal, adding that Edelson PC, prosecutors and the state bars will “bring bad actors to account.”

Judge Thomas M. Durkin of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois on Wednesday dismissed a motion for contempt filed by Chicago-based local attorney Edelson-Girardi Keese in the class action lawsuit. in the crash of a 2018 Boeing Co. 737 Max 8 airliner that killed 189 passengers and crew.

The court held a three-day hearing in December on the motion regarding Lira and Griffin a year after issuing an order finding disbarred plaintiffs’ attorney Thomas Girardi and his firm in contempt and entering judgment against them to the amount of the unpaid payments.

“Girardi took advantage of vulnerable people at their most vulnerable times, and he used the prestige of his profession, the reputation of American courts, and the imprimatur of this Court to do so,” Durkin said. “It is almost impossible to repair such a breach of trust.”

“The best we can do is demonstrate that the justice system smeared by Girardi has the ability to rectify its mistakes and bring bad actors to justice. With the hearings and settlements initiated by the Edelson firm, a step has been taken in that direction,” Durkin said.

Durkin has previously found Girardi dismissive for taking customers’ money. Girardi has since been disbarred from the California bar. The man and the company are involuntarily bankrupt. Earlier this year, the Edelson Company negotiated a settlement with its insurance company, which resulted in customers being paid in full.

“Evaluation of the lawyer’s conduct is now left to more competent authorities, be it a state bar, criminal prosecutors or one of the many ongoing civil proceedings dealing with specifically of the relationship between these parties or Girardi’s actions more generally,” the judge said.

Response from lawyers

Although the court did not grant all of the relief sought by the Edelson company, “we are pleased that the Court has found that we have proven that Girardi was ‘operating a Ponzi scheme with the client’s money,'” said Jay Edelson in an email.

“We look forward to continuing to do our part, through our civil affairs and public advocacy, to usher in much-needed reform,” Edelson said. “We hope that at some point the California Bar will stop being a shield protecting those who participated in Tom’s criminal scheme and instead do the job it was created to do.”

Edelson separately sued the firm, Girardi, Erika Girardi, attorneys David Lira and Keith Griffin and others, alleging they engaged in a Ponzi scheme that stole more than $100 million from clients, co-lawyers and others.

“Tom Girardi’s conduct and treatment of Lion Air customers is inexcusable. He should be held accountable for his actions as the sole owner and director of Girardi Keese,” Ryan Saba, with Rosen Saba LLP representing Griffin, said in an email. “Mr. Griffin is grateful that the victims of the Lion Air crash have been healed and sympathizes with the ordeal that has been imposed on them.

Michael D. Monico, with Monico & Spevack representing Girardi, did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

Durkin said Wednesday he was not credible Griffin and Lira, who is Girardi’s son-in-law, ‘were so completely unaware of prior disputes over client payments that they had no suspicion of conduct and motives of Girardi”.

“In short, it’s hard to believe that Griffin and Lira were unaware that Girardi was running a Ponzi scheme with clients’ money, which he in fact was,” the court said.

Edith R. Matthai, with Robie & Matthai representing Lira, said “we do not comment on the legal proceedings involving David”.

The case is In re Lion Air Flight JT 610 Crash, ND Ill., No. 1:18-cv-07686, opinion 11/2/22.

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5 things to watch: California https://tinigard.info/5-things-to-watch-california/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 21:26:59 +0000 https://tinigard.info/5-things-to-watch-california/ BERKELEY, Calif. – Oregon’s football team is in the driver’s seat to reach the Pac-12 Championship Game, and the Ducks will be looking to stay there when they play Saturday in California. The No. 8 Ducks (6-1, 4-0 Pac-12) are the only undefeated team remaining in the conference after knocking out previously undefeated UCLA at […]]]>
BERKELEY, Calif. – Oregon’s football team is in the driver’s seat to reach the Pac-12 Championship Game, and the Ducks will be looking to stay there when they play Saturday in California.

The No. 8 Ducks (6-1, 4-0 Pac-12) are the only undefeated team remaining in the conference after knocking out previously undefeated UCLA at Autzen Stadium last week. Cal is 3-4 overall and 1-3 in Pac-12 play; the Golden Bears’ only conference win was at home against Arizona, a team the Ducks beat on the road. One of Cal’s losses is against WSU, the Oregon team came from behind to beat on the road in the Ducks’ Pac-12 opener.

The all-time series between the Ducks and Golden Bears is tied, 41-41-2. Oregon has won eight of the last 10 games, but both losses have come at Berkeley, where Cal has a 28-17-2 advantage in the series.

Saturday’s match is scheduled to start at 12.35pm, with TV coverage on FS1. Tim Brando will provide play-by-play, with analysis by Spencer Tillman.

Some storylines to watch on Saturday afternoon…

1. Last Saturday was a day to remember for the Ducks, with ESPN’s “College GameDay” in the morning followed by a one-sided victory over the Bruins in a battle of the top 10 teams.

The Ducks have done a solid job all year to turn in emotional results, whether it’s the disappointment of the season-opening loss to Georgia or the dramatic comeback to win at WSU. Now they have to prove they can go from the top to beat UCLA.

“Some people texted me the morning after the game and said, ‘How do you feel after this win? ‘” OU coach Dan Lanning said Monday. “I said, well, I just watched the movie. So I have some concerns. There’s a lot of things that we need to correct, a lot of things that need to be improved. The piece that excites me is that, on a regular basis every week we have really improved on every level, we have to keep improving as we go.

2. If recent history holds, the Ducks are preparing for a tough battle against the Golden Bears.

The average margin of victory in their last three meetings is one touchdown, well below some of the predictions for Saturday’s game. Oregon can’t be caught off guard if the game becomes a war of attrition.

“I think anyone who turns on the television on a Saturday night is going to realize every week that you can’t predict college football,” Lanning said. “I’m watching a movie earlier today for this game, and last year it was about the last few seconds, a fourth and two on the goal line (where Oregon made a save to secure the victory). So we have to do our best every week to be able to perform at the level we feel is necessary.”

3. Oregon has been sparked in recent weeks by big offensive plays, but big games might be hard to find against Cal on Saturday.

In conference, the Ducks lead the Pac-12 with 12 plays of 30 or more yards. Cal has licensed eight of those games.

“They’re probably one of the best-drilled, strongest defenses in our conference that we’re really going to see,” Lanning said. “I think they do a really good job of that, and because of that they don’t give up a lot of big plays.”

4. This year’s Cal team has so much talent in the skill positions like the Golden Bears have done in recent years.

Receiver J. Michael Sturdivant had eight receptions for 104 yards and two touchdowns last week against Washington. Another freshman, running back Jaydn Ott, had 274 yards and three touchdowns in the win over Arizona.

And Cal quarterback Purdue transfer Jack Plummer “probably doesn’t get enough credit,” Lanning said. “He’s got a takeaway from his last five games – he’s done a really good job of taking care of the ball. And he throws the ball very well. He’s a talented thrower.”

5. Speaking of quarterbacks, Oregon’s Bo Nix is begins to generate buzz for the Heisman Trophy after his five-touchdown performance against UCLA.

Lanning this week described Nix as “humble and hungry,” and if Nix is ​​to stay in the Heisman race, those are exactly the traits that will do.

“He understands what we’re trying to do and execute,” Lanning said. “You never let the moment be bigger than the moment. He’s always there to play the game. He’s a smart, smart player who goes out there and performs at a high level.”

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Rural New Mexico eyes insurance fight amid wildfires https://tinigard.info/rural-new-mexico-eyes-insurance-fight-amid-wildfires/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 08:08:30 +0000 https://tinigard.info/rural-new-mexico-eyes-insurance-fight-amid-wildfires/ ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) — Manuel and Marcy Silva combed through the charred rubble that was once their home, looking for any salvageable bits from the largest wildfire in New Mexico history. Manuel found two of his high school wrestling medals. Gone are the bedroom furniture Marcy’s grandfather had built as a gift, her wedding dress, […]]]>

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) — Manuel and Marcy Silva combed through the charred rubble that was once their home, looking for any salvageable bits from the largest wildfire in New Mexico history.

Manuel found two of his high school wrestling medals. Gone are the bedroom furniture Marcy’s grandfather had built as a gift, her wedding dress, and their children’s toys.

The family was just one payment away from owning their single-width mobile home, and like many other northern New Mexico residents whose homes were in the path of the flames, the Silvas were uninsured.

After scorching more than 530 square miles (1,373 square kilometers) of the Rocky Mountain foothills, the government-ignited wildfire is helping bring to light what New Mexico officials are calling a crisis — where the coverage of insurance for everything from homes to workers’ compensation comes at premiums that often make it unaffordable for many in the poverty-stricken state.

New Mexico officials are banking on relocating a California insurer to the state and selling policies in low-income and underserved areas. But the multimillion-dollar merger involving California Insurance Co. has been clouded by pay-for-play allegations and remains stranded in court.

A California judge on Thursday did not accept New Mexico’s request to intervene in the case, but cleared the way for the state to weigh in on a proposed plan to resolve ongoing conservatorship proceedings.

New Mexico attorneys argued at the hearing that the need for more insurers has only intensified since the lawsuit began more than three years ago. They pointed out that companies are struggling to get adequate workers’ compensation coverage.

New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas told The Associated Press he’s worried families won’t be able to insure their homes because the risk of wildfire and flooding after a fire intensifies in the context of climate change.

“I’m very concerned that these natural disasters are either going to increase premiums or we’re in a deeper crisis like Florida, where insurers don’t want to come to New Mexico because it’s a very market. hard to insure,” he said.

Wildfires have burned about 11,000 square miles (28,490 square kilometers) across the United States so far this year, slightly exceeding the 10-year average. The season started early in New Mexico when the US Forest Service failed to account for ongoing drought and measures to reduce fire danger were blown out of control by high winds.

The federal government has agreed to funnel $2.5 billion in stimulus money to New Mexico in what members of the state’s congressional delegation described as a ‘down payment’ on what would be a recovery of several decades.

While relief money was celebrated by officials in New Mexico, residents of remote villages scattered in the mountains say they have struggled to file claims with federal emergency managers and that there is no There is no system to quickly get families the help they need.

Mike Maes has lined his house with sandbags and a ladder sits nearby so he and his family can escape to the roof in the event of further flooding after a fire.

“I’m not the type of person to go begging for help or crying for this, that and the other but I’m tired,” he said, lamenting being forced to take time off. from her barbershop business to clean pick up debris and a truck in water to flush toilets and take showers now that the well on her property has been destroyed.

He tried to get insurance years ago, but it would have cost more than he could have insured his property for.

The Silvas said the cost of insuring a single-width mobile home made in the 1970s was insurmountable. And the house used a wood stove for heating _ like many rural houses in New Mexico.

Marcy Silva works in information technology in New Mexico Highlands and Manuel is employed by the San Miguel County Department of Public Works. They would have opted for insurance if it was affordable.

For now, they and their two young children are living with Manuel’s parents. They hope to buy another mobile home, but have acknowledged that the historic rate of inflation is not helping and that there is still work to be done to restore their property.

“The best way I can explain it is that it’s been like an endless nightmare that just seems to get worse and worse,” Manuel said.

California Insurance Co. officials assured Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and state insurance regulators that they would fill the policy vacuum in New Mexico.

Consumer Watchdog, a progressive advocacy group based in Los Angeles, said New Mexico regulators should be careful before allowing CIC to operate in the state. The group sued California regulators in 2020 over emails and other communications after reports surfaced that California Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara had accepted political donations from insurers, although he promised during his 2018 campaign not to.

At the time, Lara apologized for accepting political contributions from people associated with Applied Underwriters – CIC’s parent company – and other insurers. He returned more than $80,000 to insurers and other donors with business before state regulators.

Those associated with Applied Underwriters included lobbyist Eric Serna, who retired in 2006 as New Mexico’s Superintendent of Insurance after state officials suspended him over conflict of interest issues.

Lara came under scrutiny again this year when Consumer Watchdog raised fresh concerns about a series of deals involving insurance industry donations and independent groups working to support her re-election.

Jerry Flanagan, the consumer group’s litigation director, said the wildfire situation homeowners in California and New Mexico are facing is heartbreaking. Statistics compiled by the insurance industry show that about 15% of properties in both states are at risk of wildfire. Only Montana, Idaho and Colorado have higher percentages.

“Unfortunately, what insurance companies expect from politicians is usually bad for consumers,” Flanagan said. “So it’s kind of like stepping out of the frying pan in the fire situation for consumers in New Mexico because you need coverage, but the story with California Insurance Co. is that we can’t trust them.”

The company disputes the allegations, calling them unsubstantiated and saying that all California insurance companies engage in some form of lobbying.

Jeffrey Silver, the company’s general counsel, wrote in an email that CIC has provided coverage throughout California and the number of complaints from policyholders and claimants for years is in single digits compared to tens. thousands of policies issued and to millions of people. covered.

Silver said it was time for California to release its “stranglehold” and pave the way for the company to do business in New Mexico, where he said it would still be subject to regulatory oversight and restrictions. periodic reviews.

Balderas, a Democrat who will complete his last term at the end of the year, said what appeals to him is that CIC would move its leadership and capital to New Mexico once the conservatorship is resolved and be subject to state regulations and taxation.

“I think you can hold a company more accountable if it’s headquartered and provides services in the state,” he said.

Lawyers are hoping for a resolution next year, but that leaves people like Maes in a difficult bind.

Describing life without basic public services and the potential for devastation that comes with every rainstorm, Maes took a long breather, trying not to choke. He said he and his neighbors were in hiding and forgotten and coping with all the devastation had been difficult.

“It’s just an ongoing thing over and over again,” he said. “I don’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, but there is hope.”

Photo: The Calf Canyon/Hermit Peak Fire burns in the mountains near Pecos, NM, Thursday, May 25, 2022. After scorching more than 530 square miles of the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, the government-ignited wildfire has helped shed some light on what officials in New Mexico are calling a crisis — where insurance coverage for everything from homes to workers’ compensation comes with premiums that often make it unaffordable for many people in the stricken state. poverty. (Eddie Moore/The Albuquerque Journal via AP, File)

Copyright 2022 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Topics
Disaster Natural Disasters Wildfire Mexico New Mexico

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